There are a range of regulations in China that can have major impacts on U.S. companies that have or plan to have business ties to that country. This includes regulations related to imports to China, such as import controls.

Recently, some news came out regarding a set of new import controls that were expected to soon go into force in China.

The import controls regard food imports into China. Among the things the new controls would do is make it so a foreign-government-issued inspection certificate is required for shipments of food into China from foreign countries.

These controls drew complaints from a range of countries, including the United States. Among these complaints were claims that the controls:

  • Could be used to restrict imports.
  • Could be used to impede market access.
  • Could disrupt a considerable amount of food-related trade.

The recent news on these controls is that China is delaying its enforcement of them. Specifically, it is instituting a transitional period of two years when it comes to the new food import controls. It has not yet been announced what exactly this transitional period will involve.

One wonders what this transitional period will consist of and what impacts this will have on what sorts of issues U.S. companies encounter when it comes to shipping food products into China in relation to their business endeavors.

Import regulations and the other types of regulations in China can have impacts on many important aspects of a U.S. company’s business efforts in China. Given this, such regulations are among the things it can be important for a U.S. business to pay close attention to when establishing business operations in China. So, U.S. businesses that are looking into forming business ties to China may want to consider taking concerns and questions they have about the regulatory environment in China and how to respond to this environment to lawyers experienced in U.S.-China business issues.

Source: U.S. News & World Report, “China Postpones Food Import Controls After Global Outcry,” Joe McDonald, Sept. 26, 2017